Disaster Preparedness, Baby & Child

As Hurricane Florence stares down the eastern seaboard and wildfires continue to rage in California, it would seem remiss to ignore that a natural disaster will likely touch all of us in some way at some point in our lifetime. Disaster preparedness is a major issue for everyone, but particularly for those of us with small children. Infants, pregnant/nursing mothers, and young children have particular needs that may not be covered by your standard emergency kit or checklist.

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To save a lot of googling, anxiety, and time (we know you already don’t have any…), we’ve compiled some of the best official disaster preparedness resources and thrown some emergency prep essentials from our own professional and parenting experience in the mix too. Some of these items are simply for comfort, while others could truly save lives.

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Basic Disaster Survival Kit

According to experts at the American Red Cross, a basic disaster supplies kit should include the following items:

  • A supply of water (one gallon per person per day). Store water in sealed, unbreakable containers. Identify the storage date and replace every six months.
  • A supply of non-perishable packaged or canned food and a non-electric can opener.
  • A change of clothing, rain gear and sturdy shoes.
  • Blankets or sleeping bags.
  • A first aid kit and prescription medications.
  • An extra pair of glasses.
  • A battery-powered radio, flashlight and plenty of extra batteries.
  • Credit cards and cash.
  • An extra set of car keys.
  • A list of family physicians.
  • A list of important family information; the style and serial number of medical devices such as pacemakers.
  • Special items for infants, elderly or disabled family members.

You can view and download the complete American Red Cross emergency preparedness checklist here.

woman holding baby while sitting on fur bean bag

Extras for pregnant moms-to-be, infants and children:

While the Red Cross checklist is a great place to start, “special items for infants” doesn’t exactly help the stressed-mom-trying-to-pack-everything mode we all enter when trying to provide for the safety and welfare of our children in the face of disaster. Luckily, the March of Dimes created an emergency checklist specifically for pregnant moms and parents with small children. They suggest adding the following items to your family’s disaster preparedness supplies.

Pregnant Mothers:

If you’re expecting, your disaster preparedness kit should include basically what you plan to pack in your L&D hospital bag, along with some (admittedly rather scary-sounding) emergency birth supplies, as follows.

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  • Emergency birth supplies (such as clean towels, sharp scissors, infant bulb syringe, medical gloves, two white shoelaces, sheets, and sanitary pads)
  • two blankets
  • closed-toe shoes
  • maternity and baby clothes
  • prenatal vitamins and other medications
  • nutritious foods, such as protein bars, nuts, dried fruit and granola
  • extra bottled water

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For baby & child:

If you have an infant/toddler/small child, think about adding the following supplemental items to your emergency supplies to keep baby happy and healthy.

  • Baby food in pouches or jars and disposable feeding spoons
  • Extra baby blankets, clothes, and shoes
  • a thermometer
  • copies of vaccination records
  • antibacterial wipes and hand sanitizer
  • dish soap
  • a portable crib
  • baby sling or carrier
  • diapers, wipes and diaper rash cream
  • medications and infant pain reliever, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen
  • small disposable cups
  • ready-to-feed formula in single serving cans or bottles

For more information, you can access the full March of Dimes emergency preparedness checklist here.

brown bear plush toy on white bed comforter inside lighted bedroom

Additional Real As A M*ther Essentials

From our collective Real M*ther experience, the following items can also be invaluable for baby, child, and parent during extended power outages and temporary lodging situations that often accompany storms and natural disasters.

Anker cell phone charger

This rechargeable cell phone charger can provide you with extra hours of phone battery life when the power is out. Given all that we rely on our cellular devices for these days, it’s smart to have a way to access important information stored on your phone.

Nursing supplies for breastfeeding moms

Nursing pads, lanolin ointment/coconut oil, breast pump (with batteries and/or manual!) and bottling supplies, nursing pillow and extra blankets. Extra pacifiers.

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Battery powered lanterns

Candles are too dangerous, and flashlights become play-things in our house full of little ones. These waterproof Energizer lanterns are functional, bright, and provide hands-free illumination for a whole room. They also have a nightlight setting for which is great for kids’ rooms at night, and a 350 hour run time. We have three and use them almost constantly for one thing or another.

baby s green and purple highchair

Non-perishable kid’s protein sources

Getting your kids to eat is hard enough in perfect weather. When conditions may be challenging (OK, basically anything that involves the refrigerator not working is challenging with kids, but hangry kids won’t help) keep their bellies full with healthy, non-perishable protein sources. Some of our favorites are:

  • Earth’s Best baby yogurt pouches;
  • Nut butters like these Justin’s single-serve almond butter pouches (and don’t forget the Nutella!);
  • Larabars (natural ingredients, but soft enough for little ones to munch);
  • Horizon organic milk boxes (no refrigeration required); and
  • Snap Pea crisps (5g of pea protein per serving!)

Additional medicines for baby & child

Children’s Benadryl, Allergy/Asthma medications (as required), Simethicone drops or Gripe Water for little tummies. Band-aids, peroxide, and Neosporin for slips and falls and bumps.

Battery operated fans

In the hot summer months of hurricane season, the air circulation provided by even a small fan can go a long way to help kids and adults sleep comfortably during power outages. These O2Cool portable fans can be battery operated, no cords required.

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Battery powered sound machine

A little sleep goes a long way for everyone. A comforting song or white noise is a great way to help little ones (and adults for that matter) sleep in cramped, loud, or new environments, and when the electricity is out these battery powered machines can be a big help keeping little ones asleep without draining your phone.

brown bear plush toy

Comfort Objects and distractions

Stuffed teddy, puzzles, favorite books. Whatever makes your kids feel comfortable, along with a few activities to keep their minds active and away from potential disaster-related anxieties.

Birth Certificates

If you are concerned about damage to your home or potential evacuation, you can avoid a lot of potential hassle by bringing your child’s birth certificate along. Many times, we forget that children need ID in several situations too!

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Your Village

Remember that no matter what your circumstances, no one experiences a natural disaster alone.  Reach out to neighbors, school groups, church groups, and shelters. Get out of your comfort zone and connect. You’ll be surprised how many people are willing to help, and how many you can likely help as well. At the end of the day, we are all the village.

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Our thoughts and prayers are with everyone recovering from, and preparing for a natural disaster. Be safe y’all.

fullsizeoutput_658Christiana is a Navy wife and mother of 3, attorney and former realtor, world traveler, home renovator and decorator, yogi, fitness enthusiast, and recipe & wine explorer.

Photo credit: Tara Liebeck Photography

Pregnant, MD: What’s Safe in Pregnancy Myth vs Fact, Part 1

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Photo Credit: Fiona Margo Photography

Hey mamas and mamas-to-be! There is a lot of confusing and alarmist information out there on the interwebs about the safety of lots of things everything in pregnancy. We all want to be safe, but also to not be deprived of allofthethings for 9+ months. This post is a quickie guide to set the record straight on some of the most common questions we pregnancy providers get. This, like all my posts, are not ever meant to replace the personal guidance of your own health care provider – when in doubt, as them! I’m breaking this down on the following very non-scientific scale:

Myth – Mostly Myth – Kind of Fact – Mostly Fact- Fact

No Coffee – Myth

Our family lived in Portugal when I was in Kindergarten and first grade, so that was about the time I started drinking coffee. No joke. So, when I was learning about pregnancy, you better believe I looked up all the information on this topic! I can’t tell you how many people I have talked to – even other doctors – who are under the impression people have to stop drinking all caffeine the moment they conceive. That’s just cruel.

My actual face if you told me not to drink coffee while pregnant.

The truth is, The Cochrane Review looked at the research and the best studies have shown no difference in pregnancy outcomes with moderate caffeine intake. What’s “moderate caffeine intake”? About 200mg caffeine daily. That’s one tall Starbucks brewed coffee or an espresso drink with 2 shots. Strong black tea has about 50mg per cup and regular or diet soda (bad for other reasons….but) about 35mg. Energy drinks vary widely – if you want to look up your specific fave bev, check out Caffeine Informer.

No Hot Tubs – Mostly Fact

This one is legit. Studies have shown that raising your core body temperature can increase the risk of miscarriage in early pregnancy and other complications later on in pregnancy. This is true whether it’s a high fever from being sick or you are in a hot tub, sauna, hot yoga, or even hot bath or shower at home.

Does this mean you can’t take a quick hot shower ever? No! You can go in any of these warm environments for a little while. What’s a little while? As soon as you feel hot, break a sweat, or of course if you feel light headed at all, leave and cool off immediately. If you can’t trust yourself to make that judgement, avoid altogether.

No Hair Treatment – Mostly Myth

The old types of hair treatments for dying and perming had toxic chemical derivatives which were potentially dangerous, especially in first trimester of pregnancy.

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Definitely got my hair did before these pics.

Newer dyes should be free of these chemicals and are ok. Highlights that aren’t applied to your scalp are also fine – just stay in a well-ventilated area because your breathing can be more sensitive during pregnancy. Perms and straightening treatments again vary – ask your salon if they offer safe, natural alternatives to the older more harsh treatments. More info HERE on American Pregnancy’s Website.

No Nail Polish – Mostly Myth

You can get your nails did with no worries as long as the salon uses good hygiene practices. One of my favorite midwives from my training at UCSF, Judith Bishop, wrote a great summary HERE on this. Any kind of polish and even fake nails are ok. Beware though – the chemical smells might make your sensitive nose and stomach unhappy!

No Cheese – Mostly Myth

The key here is *pasteurized*. You can get Listeria, a dangerous bacterial infection that can cause miscarriage, from unpasteurized dairy products. Pasteurized cheeses that are within their expiration dates and have been properly stored are fine. Even soft cheeses. Most restaurants should be able to tell you if their cheese is “raw” or pasteurized – if they can’t skip it.

appetizer assorted bowl cheese

No Lunchmeat – Kind of Fact

This again is due to Listeria concern. You should avoid lunch meat unless it’s been heating to steaming in the microwave, stovetop or oven. Not sure how you feel about warm lunchmeat, but this preggo is NOT for it! Opt for grilled chicken, tuna salad (no more than 2 servings per week though) or other choice if you don’t like warm sliced meat.

 

No Fish – Kind of Fact

Speaking of tuna…. The main concern with seafood is about mercury. Check out and print yourself THIS PDF from American Pregnancy if you want a quick guide to which fish are “highest mercury” aka, avoid entirely or just “high mercury” aka have no more than 2 small servings weekly or lower and you can enjoy at will.

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Photo by Skitterphoto on Pexels.com

What about sushi?? So, cooked sushi is always ok as long as you are paying attention to mercury issues. Raw sushi *theoretically* should all be flash frozen based on USDA safety regulations and therefore should NOT have the parasites that are of concern in pregnancy. However, you are putting your trust in the sushi fish purchaser and preparer in this care, so approach with caution.

 

 

 

 

No Strenuous Exercise – Mostly Myth

There are no strict guidelines regarding exercise in pregnancy because this is highly variable as to what is safe and normal for YOU. There are elite athletes who’s “norm” is to run 10 miles or lift hundreds of pounds of weights on the regular. There are couch potatoes who get winded walking up a single flight of stairs.

Seriously, though… Exercising in pregnancy is actually key to having a healthy pregnancy, easier delivery, and – get this – fewer stretch marks! The main guide here is how the exercise makes YOU feel. Yes, that’s right, you have to listen to your body. This is not the time to “push through” and override your body telling you it is hot, too winded or  overworked. You will need to be more cautious with yourself because your blood flow is altered, your body shape is changing and your muscles, ligaments and tendons will be affected by relaxin hormone eventually.

No Sex – Mostly Myth

OK, think about it. If having sex while pregnant was dangerous, do you really think humans would have survived this long? A lot of pregnant woman have their libido skyrocket thanks to increased blood flow to the lady parts (though if you don’t that’s nothing to worry about). It is ok and GOOD to have sex if you want to in pregnancy. Get. It. On.

A few words of caution though… If you have pain or bleeding during sex, stop. Have your doctor check you and tell you if it’s safe to continue having intercourse during your pregnancy. And if you’re pregnant and single – you need to be ultra careful about not contracting an STD. They can cause severe birth defects, miscarriage or stillbirth if contracted while you are gestating. Safe sex – good. Unsafe sex – bad.

No Smoking – Fact

This includes ALL smoking. Smoking cigarettes and being exposed to second-hand or even third-hand (if you smell it even though no smoke is around, that’s third-hand smoke) can cause complications in pregnancy. If you are smoking when you conceive, talk to your provider right away about how they can help you quit. If people around you are smokers, same goes. It is NOT sufficient for them to just go outside. If your sensitive sniffer can smell the smoke, you’re being exposed. 

What about pot? It’s legal now and stuff, and doesn’t it help with appetite? NO, not safe in pregnancy. Marijuana has been shown to increase rates of ADHD, anxiety and other cognitive disorders in children who were exposed in utero. Stay away.

No Alcohol – Mostly Fact

Saved the most controversial for last! So, here in the USA, all of the official guidelines from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Academy of Pediatrics, etc… go along these lines, “There is no amount of alcohol known to be safe in pregnancy”. So, pregnancy providers will tell you to abstain completely from the time of ovulation if you might conceive through birth.

The Royal College of OBGYNs (Britain’s version of ACOG) takes a slightly more relaxed tone, saying “The safest approach is not to drink alcohol at all if you are pregnant, if you think you could become pregnant or if you are breastfeeding. Although the risk of harm to the baby is low with small amounts of alcohol before becoming
aware of the pregnancy, there is no ‘safe’ level of alcohol to drink when you are pregnant”. None of the large studies done recently showed negative effects on the baby or child with having a few drinks per week. However, the risk of preterm birth with alcohol exposure and of the devastating fetal alcohol syndrome makes pregnancy providers approach this with significant caution.

I know you are looking for a straight forward “yes you can have a glass of wine now and then” or “no, alcohol is truly dangerous”. We don’t have that yet. As a health provider, I follow the lines of saying, no amount is safe. As a woman physician, I know a whole lot of doctors who have read the studies and comfortably go ahead and have a drink now and then in the later parts of pregnancy. Ultimately, you’re in charge of making that decision for yourself and your unborn. Think about whether the anxiety when your kid seems hyper at age 3 that maybe they have subtle effects because you had a glass of wine at that dinner party is manageable vs the benefit you’ll really get from said glass of wine. You should for SURE never get drunk or even tipsy – that’s a no-brainer.

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Photo Credit: Fiona Margo Photography

What else?

This is why I called this Part 1… Please, comment away with questions, Myths you want busted, funny examples of crap your mother in law told you was unsafe in pregnancy! Part 2 will be based on your input. Whatcha wanna know??

Dr. Annie is a married mom of 2 with 1 more on the way (bump captured by Fiona Margo in the above pics, if you’re in the PNW look her up!!) and family physician in California.

Dr. Annie Answers: Water Safety

TRIGGER ALERT, Child loss and drowning discussed in this post. It’s not fun to read about but it might, just might, save your kid’s life.

Yesterday, we got to enjoy a rare hot and sunny Washington day on our friend’s ski boat. After the husbands took turns reliving their glory days on wakeboard and mono-ski, we put out the “Sidewinder” tube and my good friend went out for a much more tame go with her son and our two girls.

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Everyone was safely ensconced in life jackets. My husband, ER doctor and former lifeguard, was perched on the back of the boat ready to leap in if anyone was jostled off. Both girls know how to swim without floaties. We never went over 15 mph. And still, with every bump, every turn over the wake, my heart was in my throat imagining one of them popping off into the water and drowning.

As a doctor, I know that drowning is the leading killer of children aged 1-4. If there is only time for 1 thing to talk about at the end of a well-child visit, that’s the one I target. It’s something most parents worry about whether they know the statistics or not. And yet – we still miss the biggest risk most of the time.

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Kids are not at high risk of drowning when we are all playing together in the pool. They’re not at high risk even when bouncing along in a life jacket behind a boat. It’s when we don’t think they’re going in the water at all that the danger is highest.

The day before our boating, I had lounged and gabbed with our friends on the beach – Rosie and Mimi 200 yards down the empty shore collecting seashells and I was honestly more worried that the bald eagle we kept spotting would come carry one of them away than the very real danger they could wander down to the water’s edge without us noticing and drown in moments. We ALL forget that it’s these unguarded moments that are the real danger. Even the professionals. 

The recent stories of toddlers drowning in the media – including the tragic loss of Bode Miller’s daughter and Nicole Hugh’s son – have started a new fight to promote water safety with the AAP and in the public eye. They highlight just how quickly the lives of even the best parents can be changed by drowning. And also, that you can do things to decrease the risk and improve chances of survival.

So, what can you do? Should we all keep life vests on our kids 24/7 when we are in walking distance of water? Should we just give up and never let them around water deeper than an inch? Leashes? Well…. I mean you could. But, there are more practical solutions.

1) Education

Talk to your kids about water safety from the beginning. I have erred on the side of scaring them about it because I’d rather they be a little timid as swimmers than over-confident.

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Strongly consider enrolling them in ISR Self Rescue classes sometime after age 6 months and before 6 years old. These classes teach infants to toddlers how to roll over and float safely if they fall into water.

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Photo credit: Brendan Nicholson

I think my friend, the super smart mama Dr. Elizabeth Nicholson (that’s her cutie above), says it best:

I’ve seen conflicting opinions of ISR over the years … As an Emergency Medicine physician, I am painfully aware of drowning risks. Each summer, I console at least one family after the loss of their child. Primary prevention, such as locked fences and sturdy pool covers are the most important, but we all know that even the most attentive caretakers have escape artists for children. It takes only seconds.

I wanted to have extra seconds to find my kids. I viewed drowning prevention through ISR like buckling a car seat or holding my hand in a busy parking lot. It might not have been fun every minute, but crucially important.

Our instructor is wonderful. She pushes the kids in a safe a supported manner. They are reassured during class and proud after learning new skills. Even with vastly different temperaments, both of my kids have learned the skills AND love the water. See for yourself!

 

 

Want to see it in action? Check out the video of the “final lesson”, falling in with clothes on below:

Look up the closest certified program to you here.

2) Tools

  1. Barriers: If you own a pool, a pool fence or safety-focused pool cover is a MUST. We moved into the gorgeous backyard oasis above, but all I saw was drowning risk until we got our All-Safe Pool Fence. If you’re inside and not in “swim mode”, keep the kids behind locked doors – make sure the locks are child-proof. A hook lock at home or simple stick-on child lock at a vacation rental can be applied to most sliders above child’s reach to be safe.
  2. Lifeguards: If you’re at someone else’s home or on a watery fun vacation without a fence, treat watching the kids like lifeguards do. Someone should always be the primary observer. If that person needs to go, they need to actively and explicitly hand off duty to another adult. When you’re in a group setting without this designation, it is WAY too easy for everyone to assume someone else is watching the kids – which is what happened to this family
  3. Life jackets: If the kids are just playing in the yard around an open pool or on the beach near the waves, they still need life jackets on and/or an adult “lifeguard”. 20045346_10100140255349096_1854036280355769801_o.jpg
  4. Pool alarms: Again, if this is your home or somewhere you go frequently, a good back-up measure is an alarm so you know it they’re in the vicinity.

3) Rescue

If you haven’t already, enroll yourself and your adult family members in a CPR class. Make sure to continue updating it when it expires. Drowning happens quickly and silently and you can’t be sure how long the kid has been in the water. If you get to them quickly, rapid initiation of CPR while someone else calls 911 can absolutely save their lives.

Adult & Child CPR Anytime Kit

You can look up classes in your area here or get at home kits. Don’t let this be one of those, “well I was meaning to do it, but we were just so busy….” items. Look it up today. Put it on the calendar for within the next month. Chances are you might literally save a life.

4) Spread the word

Tell. Your. Friends. If you see unsafe practices around water – say something. We can’t know how many lives have been saved by the preventive measures above, but it’s definitely significant. Not sure where to start? Send them this blog article or post a pic on social media saying “PSA: pool fences save lives” or whatever speaks to you. Just keep people talking about it. We should be talking about this AT LEAST as much as preventing SIDS or the proper carseat positioning in your vehicle or which screen time is the least evil screen time because it still remains the leading cause of early childhood death.

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Alternatively… stick to inland splash pads.

Dr. Annie is a married mom of 2 plus 1 on the way and family physician in the Sacramento area.

Dr. Annie Answers: Sunscreen Low Down

Anyone else feel utterly overwhelmed by THIS when you hit the stores lately? The choices are ENDLESS!!

Whether you’re still in flurries or the sun is shining, summer is coming! You all know by now that sunscreen is absolutely critical for you and your fam to prevent deadly skin cancer (if not, what rock have you been living under, seriously??). The huge array of options can be super overwhelming.

I’m going to try to simplify things here. There are 3 rules:

  1. Choose physical over chemical sunscreens.
  2. Choose creams/lotions over sprays.
  3. If your choices are limited, still choose some sunscreen over no sunscreen.

In slightly more detail….

Physical vs Chemical

There are 2 ways to block the sun’s damaging rays. One is physical blocking. This includes simple shade or clothing or reflective minerals that you put on your skin. The two primary ones are Zinc Oxide or Titanium Dioxide. The other way to decrease UV radiation is with chemical sunscreens. These are ingredients like Avobenzone, Oxybenzone, Dioxybenzone. Yes, these block UV rays. However, they have not been studied well in humans and in animal models, can be absorbed through the skin – aka, get into the bloodstream and cause problems with endocrine function (thyroid regulation, hormone regulation, blood sugar regulation). Gross.

There is an awesome guide for brand-to-brand ratings here EWG’s Guide to Sunscreens. Our family’s go-to’s are:

Screen Shot 2018-04-10 at 10.10.07 AMBare Republic Mineral Sunscreen

Easy to find at Target and Amazon, goes on nicely, badass bottle (I’m a sucker for good marketing). Sport and Baby versions available. Stick version convenient for little faces.

 

 

Screen Shot 2018-04-10 at 10.12.15 AMCalifornia Baby Super Sensitive Sunscreen

No, I don’t just love this because it says “California Baby” (ok maybe a little), it’s also ultra-sensitive for the rashiest kids. Again, stick version available.

 

 

 

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Blue Lizard Australian Sunscreen because you know the Aussie’s got the sunscreen game DOWN. This goes on easily – not just for babies ;^)

 

Arbonne Baby Care Mineral Sunscreen Screen Shot 2018-04-10 at 10.49.35 AM

 

 

 

 

Arbonne is sold directly through independent providers – I get my goods from my awesome niece (she’s an adult, we have a crazy big family) Megan Fikes

 

 

 

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Elta MD UV Clear Tinted This is the only sunscreen that has EVER not made my face allergic, and with slightly tinted look, is flattering and not white. I wear this every. single. day.

 

 

 

 

 

I can hear you now:  But lotion is so hard to get on a whining, wiggling kiddddd!!! 

Strategy: Before you even get dressed to go wherever fun, sunny place you’re going, apply to your naked child. This way you have a “base layer” in case of wedgies or – if your kids are like mine – unexplained nakedness. Then, just touch up when the clothes come off. Reapply (of course) every 2 hours or when they get out of a body of water and defrost/dry off for a bit.

Spray vs Lotion

When you, as an adult, put on that super-convenient aerosol-spray clear chemical sunscreen, have you ever gotten a *little* of the spray up your nose at the end? And you know how to hold your breath well. Game over for kids – they’re for sure getting it in their nose, eyes, mouth… lungs, stomach. I’m a laid-back parent about dirt, mess, hair dye, the occasional junk-food treat. But chemicals being inhaled and swallowed?? nope.

That being said… there are times and particular children that do require faster application. So IF you must use a spray, top choice is a manual spray bottle with mineral sunscreen, because, the environment. Choice 2 is aerosol mineral sunscreen. Really, just avoid the chemical ones unless it is literally the ONLY way to not have a severely sunburned child.

Kiss My Face SPF 50 SprayAlba Botanical Refreshing Spray Mineral SunscreenBare Republic Spray

Final Rule: Some protection is better than nothing.

Questions come up in clinic all the time about “how old does my baby have to be to wear sunscreen?”. The best, safest sun protection for babies is to keep them in the shade. This goes for all ages, actually.  Avoid the strongest sun, wear hats and loose layers when you can, seek shade.

This is most applicable for babies that are non-mobile. That is the primary reason that the typical recommendation is to start sunscreen when your baby is 6 months old. That is when most babies start to crawl and shade is less reliable. That being said – if you’re gonna be at a sunny farmer’s market with your 4 month old baby in the Ergo, they might pull their perfect sun-protective hat off and yes, you should put a little swipe of safe, mineral sunscreen on their sweet face and hands and toes if they’re exposed.

And if you’re in a pinch, forgot alllll the sunscreen in the bag (maybe because someone left that bag in the entryway when the kids were being loaded into the car…), and the only sunscreen available is some aerosol Coppertone at the gas-station. Yes. Use the sunscreen. Life is all about minimizing risk and doing the best we can.

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Dr. Annie is a married mom of 2, family doctor, amateur blogger and Nerium international independent brand partner. This post is her own opinion, is not sponsored by any products listed and does not replace the personal advice of your own physician.