Dr. Annie Answers: A Parent’s Intuition

Many of the things that people have said they appreciate about me as a doctor are the direct result of advice from one of my best mentors. One thing – trusting a parent’s intuition – has literally saved the lives of multiple patients of mine, and now hopefully, also that of my nephew. He’s in the womb below, while I was also preggers with baby #2.

As a resident, I remember feeling so lost in the beginning about offering advice on things like breastfeeding or colicky babies or a kid with a weird rash. I had been around lots of kids, sure, but I had never been pregnant, had never tried to breastfed a baby, or to get a fussy toddler to take medicine.

I, for sure, gave some asinine advice in those early days and more than once had patients laugh in my face (sorry pregnant patient who I tried to tell to work on her core strength for third trimester back pain!!). What Dr. Pippitt told me was, “Of course you don’t know their kid better than they do, but you do know medicine better than most of them.” Her advice now seems so obvious – let parents be the experts on their own kids. This applies to people being the expert on their own bodies also, but I’ve found we misinterpret ourselves more than parents do their kids…. so paying attention to what parents think is even more important IMHO.

Since then, I, of course, have become a mom twice over. I know tons more practical advice and can be quite a bit more helpful in treatment strategies. But! I still know that every parent is the expert on their own kid. My bottom line advice for when to have something checked out, followed up on, checked out again is always “if you, as the parent, are still worried or feel something’s not right”.

The validity of this was recently driven home in a tragic way. My sister, back in March, called me on FaceTime to show me a lump on her 3 year old kid’s neck. I took one look at it and thought, “that’s not normal”. My sister and her wife agreed and took him in to their pediatrician right away. The doc told them it was nothing to worry about. But… they were still worried when it didn’t go away. They saw ENT who also said it was nothing. But… they were still worried. Finally at 2 month follow up, it was bigger, not smaller. A few weeks later an MRI and biopsy had confirmed it was Hodgkin Lymphoma, an extremely rare, but very treatable diagnosis in someone his age.

Their intuition was right on, and had they not followed up despite being told it was nothing, it could have been caught at a later and more dangerous stage.

So, the next time you find yourself with that, “something’s not right” feeling, go ahead and get checked. This goes for your own body too, of course. Make sure the provider you see is able to make you feel confident that your fear can be ruled out before you go. This doesn’t mean they will do every test imaginable every time – sometimes we can take a look at something and tell you with high level of certainty, “you don’t need to worry”. We did go to school for a long time to learn that medical side of things, after all. But, if your care provider doesn’t listen to or respect your knowledge about your own kid or your own body, find a new one.

Dr. Annie is a married mother of 2, aunt of dozens of other amazing kids and family doctor in the Sacramento Area.

Ps. If you want to support my sister & her family, you can find them on Caringbridge.com under starlinglynnalesker

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Real As A M*ther

Four girls became best friends in high school and have stayed together through a whole lot of life. We are now a doctor, a lawyer, a financial advisor and a badass doula slash massage therapist and homesteader and want to share what we've learned as wives, moms, women and in our careers with the world... and entertain you along the way!

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